Issue 5, Week of October 8 

This Week's Goods...

The Age of Outrage.  In the age of outrage, does mindful resistance have the answer? This piece asks us to take a good, hard (mindful) look at the impulse to respond to Trumpian policy with outrage. As said by the author, Robert Wright: “indignation is a resource to be deployed carefully, on occasions when its importance outweighs its tendency to reinforce Trump’s self-serving persecution narrative.” Wright ends by reminding us that it’s about discernment, not passivity: if you’re worried about “becoming that stereotype of a Buddhist, so calm that you cease to care about the damage Trump is doing to the country and the world — then you must be a lot less worked up about the situation than I am.” Vox

Flavors of Enlightenment.  Not all meditation is the same.  Some improves focus and attention; others increase compassion and empathy. The Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Germany found that different types of meditation produced different changes in the brain. Here’s an interesting finding: When mindfulness meditators were asked to give a presentation at short notice, “their cortisol levels were no different from those in controls.”  Yet after engaging in face-to-face sessions coupled with compassion or perspective-based meditation, “volunteers showed up to a 51 per cent drop in cortisol levels compared with controls.” New Scientist

Calming the Journalist Mind.  A read through the headlines can be a pretty dark experience. As the journalism school at Reyerson University in Toronto incorporates mindfulness classes, it’s worth asking: what would mindful journalism look like? More focus and less stress for journalists.  But what else? Perhaps a more thoughtful, compassionate approach to how content affect users? As one media professor asks: “Could journalists … more mindfully steer reporting toward creating the condition that could help resolve conflicts rather than fuel them?” Some people will call this bias, others will call it enlightenment. Media Shift

From the celebrity world...

Comedian Russell Brand (aka @rustyrockets) said that “ultimately spirituality worked” for him as he sought recovery from alcohol and heroin addiction.  Sober for 14 years now, he calls his practice of meditation “the most important thing in the world.”  Brand also made the link to current opioid addiction that is ravaging the United States. Refinery 29

After the horrific gun violence that took place in Las Vega, Lady Gaga led her fans in a 20 minute meditation.  "I am calm, I am light," she repeated throughout the session.  E Online

A personal reflection...

Imagine looking into the eyes of a stranger and asking, “what makes you suffer?”  And then asking again. And again. And again. The Mindful Goods

Something to take forward... 

"When we meet like this, I may not have the words, so let me say it now: Nothing compares to the sensation of being alive in the company of another. It is God breathing on the embers of our soul." Mark Nepo

Get in touch... 

Drop us a note at home@themindfulgoods.com