Issue 2, Week of September 17

This Week's Goods...

Remembering EQ. Is your boss/colleague/anyone-you-know kind of a jerk?  Well, mindfulness would certainly help.  But don’t forget to add the emotional intelligence. Famous EQ author @DanielGolemanEI recommends “formal EQ assessment and coaching” and tools such as “role-playing, modeling other leaders you admire, and rehearsing in your mind how you might handle emotional situations differently.” Harvard Business Review

Secondary Traumatic Stress. It’s something that can happen to those counseling trauma victims and it can lead to a serious case of job burnout.  This article gives mostly testimonials from social workers who say meditation and yoga are what give them the strength to care for others. The Guardian

Stoop Meditation. We all crave community and sometimes it shows up in unlikely places. Danielle Fazzolari, a teacher at @MNDFLMEDITATION, invited neighbors to meditate on her Brooklyn stoop and the gathering took off. People who lived next to each other for years met for the first time.  Here’s her take: “The point of mindfulness is to not miss this beautiful life that is in front of us, that so often gets covered up by society.” BK Reader

In the App World. Happy Waves. Says the founder, Australian actor and model @NickBracks: “It is a holistic wellness app and contains guided meditations and courses that are all about helping people, men, women and kids, to create better thinking habits in many different areas.” Herald Sun (Melbourne)

Self-Love in Prison. Two sisters are bringing yoga and mindfulness to women prisoners in Idaho once a week for eight weeks. "It's like a little bit of an escape from our surroundings. You don't really feel like you're in prison at all, " says one. Can yoga and mindfulness reduce recidivism?  So far no one seems to be studying it, but let’s find out! KTVB (Idaho)

In the theaters...

“Mindfulness is always to arrive in the here and now,” says revered monk Thích Nhất Hạnh in this trailer for the new documentary, “Walk with Me.”  The trailer has the look and feel of Hollywood, but the content is all mindfulness. Actor Benedict Cumberbatch narrates as the film goes “deep inside a Zen Buddhist community which practices the art of mindfulness with their famous teacher Thích Nhất Hạnh.” Apparently, the film is already doing well and has “one of the strongest theatrical on demand openings to date.” As mindfulness continues to creep up on the mainstream, it’s not surprising that this film is foremost generating its success in the theatrical-on-demand (ie, crowdsourced) model. Screen Daily

What the critics say...

For those of you who like philosophy (be prepared for sentences like this: “Aristotle made the same distinction, contrasting two kinds of action or praxis: kinesis and energeia.”)

The author worries that if we get too enmeshed in the present moment, we’ll stop trying to make a difference in the world. My guess is many meditators have asked themselves something similar: what’s the right balance between accepting the moment and standing up for our beliefs. New York Times

A personal reflection...

Being in pain sucks. Being hurt pretty much sucks. Being sad can actually feel physically painful.
But a painful emotion attached to painful thoughts can be deadly. The Mindful Goods

Something to take forward... 

Every decision you make -- every decision that you make every second -- is not a decision about what to do, it is a decision about who you are. Every act is an act of self-definition.  @realNDWalsch

Get in touch... 

Drop us a note at home@themindfulgoods.com